People

Mark Meitzen

Mark Meitzen

Senior Consultant

PhD, University of Wisconsin–Madison

Mark Meitzen has been employed at Christensen Associates since 1990, and has expertise in the economic analysis of network industries, including telecommunications, railroad, electricity, and postal. He was a principal author of the Christensen Associates’ studies of the U.S. freight railroad industry, commissioned by the U.S. Surface Transportation Board (STB). Mark was also the project manager for the supplemental report to the STB on railroad capacity and investment issues, and was the principal investigator of the National Cooperative Freight Research Program study, Preserving and Protecting Freight Infrastructure and Routes. Mark has filed testimony in a number of STB regulatory proceedings and has also served as an expert witness in telecommunications industry regulatory proceedings. Mark also has experience in civil litigation matters as an expert witness on antitrust, intellectual property, and employment issues. Prior to joining Christensen Associates, Mark was a corporate economist at Southwestern Bell Telephone Company, and an assistant professor of economics at Eastern Michigan University and the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee.


News & Updates

Christensen Associates Assists the Postal Service Office of Inspector General in Analyzing Price Cap Issues

August 17, 2015 - In response to a request by Senator Thomas Carper, the Postal Service OIG engaged Christensen Associates to update and extend a 2013 analysis of the Postal Service price cap system. The update confirms that the current price cap regulation is financially unsustainable.


US Postal Service OIG Exploring 3D Printing

August 12, 2014 - The U.S. Postal Service (USPS) Office of Inspector General (OIG) released its white paper on the advancing technology of 3D printing. The USPS OIG contracted with Christensen Associates to assist on this study. Our analysis of commercial package volume data showed that 3D printing could lead to an increase in annual revenue of as much as $485 million due to new package shipments.

The ubiquitous first- and last-mile postal network would be a strong asset for connecting emerging 3D printing businesses with their customers. Additionally, excess space in postal facilities offers tantalizing partnership opportunities for businesses committed to fast, streamlined delivery of 3D-printed goods.


Minnesota Freight Rail Economic Development (FRED) Study Released

November 22, 2013 - Christensen Associates was part of a team that studied the potential for freight rail economic development in the state of Minnesota. The project, sponsored by the Minnesota Department of Transportation in conjunction with the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development, identified specific opportunities for more effective collaboration among shippers, railroads, and economic development agencies, and transportation agencies. The recommendations made in the report can lead to expanded local rail access, complementary business development, and improved rail and intermodal service options.


Final Report on Preserving and Protecting Freight Infrastructure and Routes Published by the Transportation Research Board

April 19, 2012 - A consortium led by Christensen Associates investigated issues related to freight corridor encroachment. The objective of this 16-month research, funded by theTransportation Research Board's National Cooperative Freight Research Program (NCFRP), was to provide guidance to public and private stakeholders on how to develop, preserve, protect, and enhance freight transportation infrastructure and routes for all modes of transportation. The final report is now available.


Staggers Act Articles and Research Papers

January 03, 2011 - Christensen Associates researched and forecast the the impact of the Staggers Rail Act of 1980. Thirty years on, they return to the issues of railroad productivity, provide updated analysis, and review how well they foresaw the impacts of deregulation on the U.S. Freight Railroad industry.